Maria Temming

Maria Temming

Assistant Editor, Science News Explores

Previously the staff writer for physical sciences at Science News, Maria Temming is the assistant editor at Science News Explores. She has undergraduate degrees in physics and English from Elon University and a master's degree in science writing from MIT. She has written for Scientific AmericanSky & Telescope and NOVA Next. She’s also a former Science News intern.

All Stories by Maria Temming

  1. A photo of a Caribbean box jellyfish on a dark background.
    Animals

    These brainless jellyfish use their eyes and bundles of nerves to learn

    No brain? No problem for Caribbean box jellyfish. Their seemingly simple nervous systems can learn to avoid obstacles on sight, a study suggests.

  2. illustration of blue and green atoms inside the superheavy element tennessine
    Chemistry

    50 years ago, the quest for superheavy elements was just getting started

    In the 1970s, scientists were on the hunt for superheavy elements. They’ve since found more than a dozen and are searching for more.

  3. A beige snake has an egg inside its throat.
    Animals

    A little snake’s big gulp may put all other snakes to shame

    The humble Gans’ egg-eater can wrap its mouth around bigger prey than any other snake of its size.

  4. illustration of a person wearing pajamas flying through the air with blue a pink hues
    Neuroscience

    Here’s what lucid dreamers might tell us about our sleeping minds

    Lucid dreaming could prove to be a powerful tool for probing dreams, one of the most universal yet elusive human experiences.

  5. An illustration of two doctors carrying a giant syringe on their shoulders.
    Health & Medicine

    50 years ago, enzyme injections showed promise for treating a rare disease

    Enzyme replacement can offer relief to people with rare diseases. Now, scientists have found a way to treat one disease before a person is even born.

  6. A photo of a northern elephant seal poking its head out of the water.
    Animals

    Northern elephant seals sleep just two hours a day at sea

    The marine mammals have truly awesome stamina for staying awake, sleeping only minutes at a time on months-long trips at sea.

  7. The surface of Venus
    Planetary Science

    Venus has almost 50 times as many volcanoes as previously thought

    Where are there NOT volcanoes on Venus? A new map of the planet unveils a veritable volcanic bonanza.

  8. a photo of human footprints in rock
    Humans

    50 years ago, scientists debated when humans first set foot in North America

    In 1973, archaeologists debated when people first arrived in the Americas. Mounting evidence suggests its much earlier than they thought.

  9. A telecom tower stands atop the Säntis mountain in Switzerland against a cloudy sky. A green laser marks the path of the powerful laser in this story.
    Physics

    A powerful laser can redirect lightning strikes

    In a mountaintop experiment, a laser beamed into the sky created a virtual lightning rod that snagged several bolts before they hit the ground.

  10. A photo of Stonehenge at sunset
    Archaeology

    50 years ago, Stonehenge’s purpose mystified scientists. It still does

    In 1972, scientists thought Stonehenge may have been a calendar. Today, we still don’t know its purpose, but we have gained insight on its origin.

  11. A night vision photo of an aye-aye with its middle finger stuck up its nose
    Animals

    Bizarre aye-aye primates take nose picking to the extreme

    A nose-picking aye-aye’s spindly middle finger probably reaches all the way to the back of the throat, CT scans suggest.

  12. The asteroid moonlet Dimorphos, taken by DART just seconds before the spacecraft smashed into it.
    Planetary Science

    NASA’s DART spacecraft just smashed into an asteroid — on purpose

    If the first-ever attempt to knock a space rock off course works, it could provide a blueprint to protect Earth from a killer asteroid.