Life

More Stories in Life

  1. An image of a 3-D scan of a fossilized trilobite with shell fragments, bits of sea urchin-like creatures and other bottom-dwellers represented in shades of red and blue.
    Paleontology

    A one-of-a-kind trilobite fossil hints at what and how these creatures ate

    The preserved contents suggest the trilobite fed almost continuously and had a gut environment with an alkaline or neutral pH, researchers say.

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  2. A 1934 photo supposedly of the Loch Ness Monster.
    Animals

    Seen Bigfoot or the Loch Ness Monster? Data suggest the odds are low

    Floe Foxon is a data scientist by day. But in his free time, he applies his skills to astronomy, cryptology and sightings of mythical creatures.

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  3. A photo of a Caribbean box jellyfish on a dark background.
    Animals

    These brainless jellyfish use their eyes and bundles of nerves to learn

    No brain? No problem for Caribbean box jellyfish. Their seemingly simple nervous systems can learn to avoid obstacles on sight, a study suggests.

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  4. Jon Nelson sits next to his son.
    Health & Medicine

    How brain implants are treating depression

    This six-part series follows people whose lives have been changed by an experimental treatment called deep brain stimulation.

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  5. A photo of Amanda sitting on a couch looking at the camera.
    Neuroscience

    Today’s depression treatments don’t help everyone

    In the second story in the series, deep brain stimulation is a last resort for some people with depression.

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  6. A computer monitor shows various brain imagery, while two surgeons operating on a person are visible in the background.
    Health & Medicine

    The science behind deep brain stimulation for depression

    The third part of the series explores the promising brain areas to target for deep brain stimulation for depression.

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  7. A photo of the connector cords used for external electrodes on a cap which can be seen on a man's head in the background.
    Neuroscience

    What’s it like to live with deep brain stimulation for depression?

    The fourth article in the series explores the physical and emotional challenges of experimental brain implants for depression.

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  8. Jon Nelson walks along a New York subway platform holding a bag.
    Health & Medicine

    There’s a stigma around brain implants and other depression treatments

    The fifth article in the series asks why people are so uncomfortable with changing the brain.

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  9. A photo of Jon Nelson and his family.
    Neuroscience

    What’s the future of deep brain stimulation for depression?

    The final story of the series describes efforts to simplify and improve brain implants for severe depression.

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